Penticton, Vernon and ROCO announce campfire ban and cite area’s extreme fire danger rating – Okanagan

0

With the Okanagan under an ongoing heat warning and temperatures near 40C, the cities of Penticton and Vernon have enacted campfire bans.

The two cities announced their respective bans on Friday, with each noting that they will take effect in the afternoon. And, at the same time, the Central Okanagan Regional District (RDCO) issued a campfire ban that will remain in effect until further notice.

The RODC ban includes West Kelowna, Lake Country, Peachland, Westbank First Nation plus Ellison, Joe Rich, North Westside and Wilson’s Landing.

Read more:

New wildfires at Kamloops Fire Center, including 2 in North Okanagan, 12 in Shuswap

As for Kelowna, the city bans campfires year-round.

“By order of the Fire Chief, there will be no campfires within the city limits of Penticton, effective July 29, 2022, at 4 p.m., until further notice,” the city of Penticton said. Penticton.

The story continues under the ad

“This order is consistent with the fire danger class that is now extreme in the South Okanagan.”

In Vernon, Fire Chief David Lind said, “Earlier today, Vernon’s fire danger level was taken to an extreme. Current conditions in the region are expected to continue for the next few days and we have experienced dry spells of lightning throughout the Okanagan Valley including the North Okanagan.

“Implementing a campfire ban allows us to reduce the risk of human-caused wildfires and protect public safety, especially at a time when weather-related risk factors have increase.

“Thank you to those who are working to FireSmart the areas around your homes and keeping fire safety behaviors in mind.”

The story continues under the ad


Click to play the video:







Record temperatures and prolonged dry spell put BC fire crews on high alert


Record temperatures and prolonged dry spell put BC fire crews on high alert

Notably, the bans announced Friday do not include approved gas appliances (eg, propane).

Provincially, Category 2 and 3 open fires are currently prohibited across British Columbia.

A category 2 open fire is either a stubble or grass fire that does not exceed 0.2 hectares or a pile that does not exceed two meters in height and three meters in width.

A Category 3 open fire is a pile that exceeds two meters in height or three meters in width, and thatch or grass that exceeds 0.2 hectares.

Although these fires are currently prohibited, the province has yet to crack down and ban campfires. On Friday afternoon, campfires were permitted at the province’s six fire stations.

The story continues under the ad


Click to play the video:







High wildfire risk ahead of British Columbia long weekend


High wildfire risk ahead of British Columbia long weekend

In Kelowna, the city has a webpage dedicated to its year-round campfire ban.

“Campfires and outdoor wood-burning appliances are not permitted in Kelowna – including fire pits, wood stoves, fireplaces and other appliances – unless the conditions are met, as stated in the regulations No. 10760 on fire and life safety,” reads the first sentence on the page.

“These restrictions do not apply to food smokers. The by-law allows us to impose requirements relating to municipal services, firecrackers, fireworks and the health, safety or protection of persons or property.

Also on Friday, the District of Coldstream announced a ban on campfires.

The district’s ban, like others introduced on Friday, includes the following:

• Campfire
• Dispose of burning substances near combustible materials
• Open pit burning
• Fireworks
• Sky Lanterns
• Tiki torches and similar torches
• Burn barrels or burn cages
• Chimneys

The story continues under the ad

“The fire risk has become extreme for our area, and current conditions in the area are expected to continue for the next several days,” the district said. “We also experienced periods of dry lightning throughout the North Okanagan region.

“A campfire ban allows us to reduce the risk of human-caused wildfires and protect public safety, especially at a time when weather-related risk factors have increased.”

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Share.

Comments are closed.